Republicans to cut popular Evers’ budget plan, leaving behind a $3.4 billion hole

    Broad GOP targets include pot, equity and sustainability

    Very tight close up on the eye on a one dollar US bill
    Photo by peasap | Flickr CC BY 2.0

    Republicans on the state’s powerful budget committee — the Joint Finance Committee (JFC) — are kicking off their work on Wisconsin’s biennial 2021-23 budget by tossing hundreds of items proposed by Gov. Tony Evers in his budget into the trash.

    The text of the motion, recently released by JFC co-chairs Sen. Howard Marklein (R-Spring Green) and Rep. Mark Born (R-Beaver Dam) has a list of the items they will spike and the list includes many of the most popular items many Wisconsinites pleaded with them to keep at statewide public hearings held in April.

    The Republican motion will also blow a $3.4 billion hole into Evers’ budget that they will need to either raise taxes or gut other budget items to cover. 

    In a recent editorial, Sen. Jon Erpenbach (D-West Point) laid out the fiscal cost of Wisconsin’s resistance as one of the few holdout states that continues to reject federal money to expand Medicaid. That money  could fill a large chunk of that multi-billion dollar hole Republicans propose to create:  “Expanding BadgerCare is the best fiscal decision for our state, and would allow an estimated 90,000 hardworking people to access affordable health care across Wisconsin,” wrote Erpenbach. “Moreover, under the federal American Rescue Plan Act, if we expand BadgerCare, our state could receive an additional $1 billion incentive payment. That’s right, $1 billion on top of the millions of dollars Wisconsin would already save. Rejecting this deal would be fiscally and socially irresponsible when we stand to help so many and save so much for the entire state.”

    Joint Finance co-chairs Sen. Howard Marklein and Rep. Mark Born in front of microphones at news conference
    Joint Finance co-chairs Sen. Howard Marklein and Rep. Mark Born | WisEye

    Kicking off the start of budget week, Born labeled Evers’ budget “unworkable” and a “nonstarter.” Even though many of Evers’ budget proposals — including legalization of cannabis, gun safety, two-thirds public-school funding by the state, BadgerCare expansion and more — have been shown to be very popular in statewide polls and at public hearings, Born said, “…we in the Legislature will work to craft our own budget. One that actually funds the priorities of Wisconsin citizens, while also keeping our balance sheet in mind and largely eliminating divisive policy items that do not belong in a budget.

    Other closely watched items the Republicans have put on the chopping block include Evers’ freeze on enrollment in voucher schools, restoring collective bargaining rights, creating statewide PFAS standards for drinking water, raising the state minimum wage gradually to $10.15, banning no-knock warrants, returning early voting decisions to municipalities, raising the age at which someone can  be charged as an adult for a crime to 18 and lowering the cost of prescription drugs including a cap on insulin costs.

    Looking at across departments, Evers’ proposals tied to equity are so thoroughly scrubbed in the Republicans’ budget that Rep. Evan Goyke (D-Milwaukee) says, “Republicans used Control+F to find every use of the work ‘equity’ and then delete it.”

    It is a longstanding practice for the leaders of JFC to eliminate policy items from the budget that their party does not support. Passing policy items in the budget is also something that frequently happens despite protestations from both sides. But Born picked one policy item to use as an example. 

    It would be bad enough if the Governor’s budget stopped at tax hikes and spending increases, but the proposal also includes a number of divisive policy items like the elimination of drug testing for welfare recipients,” said Born. “These are items that largely do not belong in the state budget. They are policy discussions that should be vetted through the normal committee process before receiving a vote in each legislative chamber, not jammed into the state spending plan.”

    Joint Finance Committee JFC Democratic Reps. Erpenbach, Goyke, Johnson, Neubauer (Photo via FaceBook)

    The meeting begins on May 6 at 11:01 am in 412 East at the Capitol and will be broadcast live on Wisconsin Eye. The committee’s first motion will be remove items from budget consideration — but despite the wording, Erpenbach has stressed the importance of the public continuing to weigh in with opinions to legislators because as he puts it, “Just because Republicans remove something from the budget doesn’t mean that it can’t be put back in.” 

    Here are the department and agency budgets that will be taken up on Thursday after the vote to eliminate the roughly 300 items in Evers’ budget. The list includes the offices of the governor, state treasurer and secretary of state — all held by Democratic constitutional elected officials.

    • Appropriation Obligation Bonds 
    • Board for People with Developmental Disabilities 
    • Board on Aging and Long-Term Care 
    • Child Abuse and Neglect Prevention Board 
    • Court of Appeals 
    • Fox River Navigational System Authority 
    • Governor 
    • Investment Board 
    • Judicial Commission 
    • Kickapoo Reserve Management Board 
    • Labor and Industry Review Commission 
    • Lower Wisconsin State Riverway Board
    • Medical College of Wisconsin
    • State Treasurer
    • Facilities Authority
    • State Fair Park
    • Secretary of State
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    What follows is a list of the items being eliminated from the governor’s budget by Republicans on the JFC.  — by department and with page numbers from the linked document left in for further details. The budgets by agency, as well as Evers’ address and more can be found on his budget page.

    ADMINISTRATION (DOA)

    This department has been dubbed the “Department of All” as many things close to the governor’s office and agencies are run from this oversight department. Worth noting in the eliminations below is how many of the items being eliminated relate to diversity, inclusion and green policies or environmental protections.

    This is also a section of the budget where Evers included progressive workforce policies for state employees, including parental leave, sick policies for LTEs and more.

    It also includes marijuana regulation and establishing offices of Environmental Justice and Sustainability and Clean Energy and automatic voter registration assistance.

    • Marijuana Regulation (Page 67, #5) 
    • Equity Grant Program (Page 24, #4)
    • Diversity, Equity and Inclusion Initiatives (Page 25, #5)
    • Diversity Goals for State Procurement and Certain Special Districts (Page 42, #1)
    • Equal Opportunity Internship Program (Page 37, #4) 
    • Foreign Language Translation (Page 45, #5)
    • Establish the Office of Sustainability and Clean Energy (Page 32, #1) 
    • Services to Non-State Entities for Risk, Management, Procurement, Sustainability and  Clean Energy (Page 45, #3)
    •  Establish the Office of Environmental Justice (Page 33, #2)
    • Green Procurement Report (Page 45, #4) 
    • Establishing the Office of Digital Transformation (Page 39, #1) 
    • Modify the Annexation Process for Counties under 50,000 (Page 28, #13) 
    • Administrative Attachments (Page 26, #9)
    • Worker Misclassification Outreach (Page 28, #15; Page 199, #14; Page 321, #7; Page 644,  #3; and Page 669, #12)
    • Transfer Administration of High-Voltage Impact Fees (Page 34, #3) 
    • Personnel Management  
    • State Employee Vacation Hours (Page 37, #5) 
    • Juneteenth Holiday (Page 35, #1)  
    • State Employee Parental Leave (Page 36, #2)  
    • Sick Leave for Limited-Term Employees (Page 36, #3)
    • Information Technology 
    • Fund of Funds Investment Program (Page 28, #14)
    • Repeal Approval Process for Capitol Security Changes (Page 27, #11) 
    • Opioid and Methamphetamine Data System (Page 40, #2 and Page 312, #8) • TEACH Program Modifications (Page 41, #3)  
    • TEACH Grants for IT Infrastructure (Page 41, #4)  
    • Assistance with Automatic Voter Registration (Page 42, #5)
    • Motion #19 Page 1 
    • Procurement and Risk Management 
    • Risk Management and Excess Insurance (Page 44, #2)  
    • Municipal Records Filings (Page 27, #12)  

    AGRICULTURE, TRADE AND CONSUMER PROTECTION (DATCP)

    This department houses agriculture combined with policies to protect Wisconsinites from unfair practices. Two items of note here are changes to Wisconsin policy on nicotine, particularly vaping and landlord/tenant regulation. There are also some climate change items, again, being cut, and as in many other departments, things tied to equity and inclusion are a GOP target.

    • Latinx Outreach Specialist (Page 54, #4) 
    • Equity Officer Position (Page 54, #5)  
    • County Conservation Staff for Climate Change (Page 64, #3)
    • Environment 
    • Broadband Consumer Protections (Page 68, #8 and Page 504, #10) 
    • Require License for Retailers of Vapor Products (Page 69, #9) 
    • Placement of Cigarette, Tobacco, and Nicotine (Page 69, #10) 
    • Unfair Drug Pricing and Advertising (Page 70, #11) 
    • Landlord-Tenant Protections (Page 70, #12)

    CHILDREN AND FAMILIES 

    This department — not just Corrections — is where one can find many of the juvenile justice initiatives Evers hoped to have in the budget, which are being cut. Again, equity positions are eliminated. 

    • TANF and Economic Support 
    • Work Experience Program Drug Testing- Marijuana (Page 87, #5) 
    • Internet Assistance (Page 95, #24)  
    • TANF Reallocation (Page 97, #29) 
    • Child Welfare 
    • Federal Law Update — Qualified Residential Treatment Programs (Page 101, #8)
    • Consolidate Statutory Provisions for the Bureau of Youth Services (Page 108, #13) 
    • Youth Justice System Improvements Program (Page 111, #2)  
    • Juvenile Justice Aids for 17- Year Old’s (Page 112, #3) 
    • Departmentwide and Child Support Enforcement  
    • Equity Grant Program (Page 114, #4) 
    • Equity Officer Position (Page 114, #5)
    • Motion #19 Page 2 

    CORRECTIONS

    Eliminations from the corrections budget include further justice initiatives, including those written to help formerly incarcerated people adjust to life outside prison, and eliminating some past punitive policies. Note, in particular, the reduction of mandatory minimum sentences, expungement of criminal records and the solution the Evers administration laid out for Lincoln Hills.

    • Agency Equity Officer (Page 122, #9) 
    • Earned Release Program Expansion (Page 124, #6) 
    • Pregnant or Postpartum Individuals in Correctional Facilities (Page 129, #15) 

    Community Corrections

    • Huber Program Eligibility Expansion (Page 132, #6)
    • Alternative to Revocation Expansion (Page 131, #4)

    Adult Sentencing 

    • Revocation and Sanctions (Page 133, #1) 
    • Earned Release Program Criteria and Eligibility (Page 135, #2)
    • Earned Release Compliance Credit (Page 136, #3) 
    • Extended Supervision Modifications (Page 137, #4) 
    • Maximum Sentence Modifications for a Class D Felony (Page 139, #5) 
    • Annual Reporting Requirements (Page 139, #6) 
    • Expungement of Criminal Records (page 141, #7) 
    • Reduction of Mandatory Minimum Sentences (Page 143, #8) 
    • Sentencing Review Council (Page 143, #9)  
    • Drug Paraphernalia (Page 144, #10) 
    • Immunity for Certain Controlled Substances Offenses (Page 144, #11) 
    • Sentence Adjustment for Youthful Offenders (Page 145, #12) 

    Juvenile Corrections 

    • New County and State Facility and Closure of Lincoln Hills (Page 148, #1)  
    • Serious Juvenile Offender Funding (Page 150, #7)  
    • Extended Juvenile Jurisdiction (Page 151, #8) 
    • Juvenile Correctional Facilities (Page 152, #9)  
    • Eliminate Type 2 Status (Page 152, #10)  
    • Community Supervision and Aftercare Supervision (Page 153, #11)  
    • Juvenile Hearings Open to the General Public (Page 153, #12
    • Age of Juvenile Jurisdiction (Page 153, #13) 
    • Original Jurisdiction of the Adult Court Over a Juvenile (Page 154, #14) 
    • Waiver Petition for Adult Court Jurisdiction Over a Juvenile (Page 154, #15)
    •  Minimum Age of Delinquency (Page 155, #16) 
    • Long-Term Placements in Juvenile Detention Facilities (Page 155, #17) 
    • Juvenile Detention Placement as Sanction (Page 156, #18) 
    • Use of Restraints on a Child in Court (Page 156, #19) 

    DISTRICT ATTORNEYS 

    • Deputy District Attorney Allocation (Page 160, #4)
    • Motion #19 Page 3

    WISCONSIN ELECTIONS COMMISSION 

    Given the nearly two dozen election bills circulating — most of which would make it harder to vote, particularly absentee — the governor’s budget sought to take things in the opposite direction — and cover costs. The sections of the WEC budget are on the chopping block, including automatic voter registration.

    • Reimbursement for Special Primary and Election Costs (Page 162, #2) 
    • Special Election Dates for Federal Offices (Page 163, #3) 
    • Recount Fees (Page 164, #6)  
    • Automatic Voter Registration (Page 164, #7 and Page 592, #6) 
    • Voter Registration Modifications (Page 166, #8) 
    • Student Proof of Identification for Voting (Page 166, #9) 
    • Temporary Identification Cards for Voting — Valid Period (Page 167, #10) 
    • Early Canvassing of Absentee Ballots (Page 167, #11) 
    •  Central Counting at County Seat (Page 168, #12) 
    •  In-Person Absentee Voting (Page 168, #13) 
    •  Residency Requirement for Voting (Page 168, #14)  
    • Voter Bill of Rights (Page 168, #15) 

    EMPLOYEE TRUST FUNDS 

    • Policy and Oversight of Disability Programs (Page 170, #5)  
    • Gifts and Grants Appropriation (Page 171, #6)  
    • Consolidate Retirement Boards (Page 171, #7)  
    • Office of Internal Audit (Page 173, #8) 
    • Distribution of Trust Fund Earnings (Page 173, #9)  
    • Health Insurance Waiting Period (Page 174, #10) 
    • Study of School Health Insurance (Page 174, #11) 
    • Domestic Partnership Benefits (Page 175, #12) 
    • Rehired Annuitant Teachers (Page 176, #13) 

    EMPLOYMENT RELATIONS COMMISSION  

    Bound to be contentious and quickly stomped on by the GOP were Evers’ attempts to restore collective bargaining and other workers’ rights eliminated in Act 10. 

    • Collective Bargaining Modifications (Page 177, #3) 
    • Local Government Employee Grievance Procedure Modifications (Page 181, #4) 

    ENVIRONMENTAL IMPROVEMENT FUND  

    • Eliminate Land Recycling Loan Program (Page 184, #3) 
    • Loan Program Application Changes (Page 185, #5) 
    • Motion #19 Page 4

    FINANCIAL INSTITUTIONS 

    • Small Business Retirement Savings (Page 188, #2) 
    • Achieving a Better Life Experience (ABLE) Savings Account Program (Page 190, #3)
    • Office of the Student Loan Ombudsman (Page 191, #4) 
    • Children’s Savings and Investment Program (Page 196, #5) 
    • Public Service Loan Forgiveness Notification (Page 197, #6) 
    • Securities and Investment Firm Fee Increases (Page 197, #7) 
    • Agency Equity Officer (Page 198, #11)  
    • Interagency and Intra-Agency Programs and Federal Funds Appropriations (Page 199,  #12)  
    • Annual Transfer to the Secretary of State (Page 199, #13) 

    GENERAL FUND TAXES 

    The impact the budget will have on Wisconsin taxes has been one of the biggest talking points for Republicans. One costly tax cut given by the GOP to a handful of Wisconsin’s wealthiest citizens is known as the Manufacturing and Agriculture tax break. Evers would have reigned it in as a part of making tax policy more progressive.

    Income and Franchise Taxes 

    • Manufacturing and Agriculture Tax Credit Limitation (Page 203, #2)  
    • Limitation on Exclusion for Nonfarm Capital Gains (Page 204, #3) 
    • Broker-Dealer Apportionment (Page 206, #5)  
    • Modify the Medical Care Insurance Deduction for Self-Employed Individuals (Page 210,  #8) 
    • Limitation on Private School Tuition Deduction (Page 210, #9) 
    • Repeal Operation Loss Carryback (Page 211, #11) 
    • Dividends Received Deduction Limit (Page 212, #12) 
    • Addition to Taxable Income of Able Account Amounts Returned to Owner’s Estate (Page  216, #18) 

    Sales and Use Tax  

    • Impose Sales Tax on Recreational Marijuana (Page 216, #1)  
    • Repeal Sales Tax Exemption for Clay Pigeons and Game Birds (Page 220, #6)
    • Repeal Sales Tax Exemption for Farm-Raised Deer (Page 220, #7) 

    Excise Tax  

    • Impose Wholesale and Retail Excise Taxes on Recreational Marijuana (Page 220, #1) 
    • Impose Tobacco Products Tax on Vapor Products (Page 221, #2) 
    • Impose Cigarette Tax on Little Cigars (Page 222, #3) 
    • Define Manufacturer’s List Price (Page 223, #4)  

    Refundable Tax Credits and Other Payments 

    • Expand Earned Income Tax Credit (Page 225, #3) 
    • Homestead Tax Credit Expansion (Page 225, #5)  
    • Enterprise Zone Tax Credit Limit (Page 226, #7)  
    • Enterprise Zone Base Year Calculation (Page 227, #8)  
    • Business Development Tax Credit Modifications (Page 230, #15)  
    • Wage Threshold for Enterprise Zone and Business Development Tax Credits (Page 230,  #16)  
    • Marijuana Tax Refunds (Page 234, #20)
    • Motion #19 Page 5 

    GENERAL PROVISIONS 

    This area includes gun safety provisions including Red Flag laws, that an overwhelming majority of Wisconsinites support. Also eliminated were measures to make statutory language gender neutral.

    • Extreme Risk Protection Restraining Orders and Injunctions (Page 235, #1) 
    • Issuance of County Debt to Replace Revenue Lost Due to Disaster or Public Health  Emergency (Page 239, #2) 
    • Municipal Debt Obligations — Deposit of Bond Premiums (Page 239, #3) 
    •  Provision and Funding of Emergency Medical Services by Towns (Page 240, #4)
    • Noncitizen Law Enforcement Officers (Page 240, #5) 
    • Local Government Competitive Bid Threshold (Page 240, #6) 
    • Local Government Risk Assessment and Resiliency Plans — Consideration of the Effects  of Climate Change (Page 240, #7) 
    • Sale of Tax Delinquent Real Estate to Tribal Governments (Page 241, #8 and Page 427,  #7) 
    • Gender Neutral Statutory References (Page 241, #9) 

    GOVERNOR 

    • Administrative Attachment to DOA (Page 243, #2) 

    HEALTH SERVICES 

    The most noteworthy elimination that came up at every budget hearing many times was expanding BadgerCare. Health equity grants and women’s health grants are also slated to be cut.

    Medical Assistance 

    • Full Medicaid Expansion (Page 253, #3)  
    • Nursing Home and Community-Based Residential Facility Rate Setting Methodology  (Page 257, #5)  
    • Eliminate Copayments for Prescription Drugs (Page 266, #20) 
    • Coverage of Group Physical Therapy (Page 271, #30) 
    • Joint Committee on Finance Review and Approval of Certain MA Program Changes  (Page 271, #31) 
    • Joint Committee on Finance Review Process for Federal Waivers, Pilot Programs, and Demonstration Projects (Page 272, #32) 

    Medical Assistance and FoodShare Administration  

    • Medical Assistance Recoveries- Qui Tam Claims (Page 274, #4) 

    Public Health 

    • Health Equity Grants (Page 279, #1) 
    • Family Planning and Women’s Health Block Grant (Page 285, #14) 
    • Drug Repository Program (Page 288, #23)
    • Motion #19 Page 6 

    Elder and Disability Services 

    Office of Caregiver Quality (Page 291, #6)  

    • Guardianship Training Requirements [language but maintain funding] (Page 291, #7) • Caregiver Designation for Hospital Releases (Page 295, #11) 
    • Statewide Minimum Rate Band for Home and Community-Based Long-Term Care  Supports (Page 297, #12) 
    • Home Care Provider Registry Pilot Program (Page 297, #13) 
    • Direct Support Professional Training Pilot (Page 297, #14) 

    Departmentwide 

    • Equity Officer Position (Page 311, #4)  
    • Statutory Changes Related to Marijuana (Page 312, #7)  
    • Public Option Study- Collaboration with OCI (Page 312, #9) 

    HIGHER EDUCATIONAL AIDS BOARD 

    • Minnesota-Wisconsin Reciprocity Agreement- Technical Colleges (Page 314, #7)  • Administrative Attachment to DOA (Page 315, #8)  

    INSURANCE 

    The Evers budget had a number of measures tied to containing costs for prescription drugs and their administration, which are referenced below, and teed up  to be cut.

    • Agency Operations and Current Programs 
    • Equity Officer Position (Page 320, #4)  
    • Convert Project Position to Permanent Position (Page 320, #5)  

    Drug Costs and Pricing 

    • Office of Prescription Drug Affordability (Page 321, #1)  
    • License and Regulation of Pharmacy Benefit Manager [language but maintain funding]  (Page 321, #2) 
    • Fiduciary Duty and Disclosure Requirements of Pharmacy Benefit Managers (Page 326, #3)
    • Licensure of Pharmacy Benefit Management Brokers and Consultants (Page 326, #4) 
    • Licensure of Pharmacy Services Administrative Organizations (Page 327, #5) 
    • Licensure of Pharmaceutical Representatives (Page 327, #6) 
    • Prescription Drug Price and Cost Reporting (Page 329, #7) 
    • Pharmacy Benefits Tool Grant Program (Page 331, #8)  
    • Prescription Drug Affordability Board (Page 331, #9) 
    • Generic Drug Importation Program (Page 336, #10) 
    • Prescription Drug Purchasing Entity Study (Page 338, #11) 
    • Applicability of Manufacturer Brand Name Drug Rebates to Deductibles and Out-of Pocket Maximums (Page 338, #12) 
    • Drug Reimbursement for Certain Entities Under Federal 340B Drug Discount Program  (Page 339, #13) 
    • Drug Cost and Payment Reporting by Hospitals Participating in Federal 340B Drug  Discount Program (Page 340, #14) 
    • Insulin Safety Net Programs (Page 340, #15) 
    • Insulin Copayment Cap (Page 345, #16) 
    • Value-Based Diabetes Medication Pilot Program (Page 345, #17)
    • Motion #19 Page 7 

    Health Insurance 

    • State-Based Health Insurance Exchange (Page 346, #1)  
    • Actuarial Study of Optional Public Health Insurance Plan (Page 347, #2) 
    • Health Insurance and Coverage Requirements (Page 348, #4) 
    • Health Insurance Premium Assistance Program (Page 355, #5) 
    • Balance Billing Restrictions (Page 356, #6) 
    • Short-Term, Limited Duration Health Insurance Plans (Page 360, #7) 
    • Telehealth Coverage Parity (Page 361, #8) 
    • School District Group Health Insurance Task Force (Page 362, #9) 

    DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE 

    While efforts to resolve the problems surrounding the storage and processing of sexual assault kits has moved forward in a less partisan fashion this session, there are still related items that have been removed from this budget.

    Also removed from this budget are universal background checks for gun purchases as well as some of the racial justice initiatives the administration and the Legislative Black Caucus have pursued tied to no-knock warrants and other use-of-force standards. The budget would have also clarified and returned settlement powers that past attorneys general have enjoyed to Attorney General Josh Kaul. His powers were cut in the GOP’s legislative lame duck session shortly after Kaul was elected.

    • Sexual Assault Kit Storage and Processing (Page 371, #11) 
    • Equity Officer Position (Page 373, #17)  
    • Open Records Location Cost Threshold (Page 374, #18) 
    • Use of Force, Training and Recruitment, No-Knock Warrants and Unnecessarily  Summoning Law Enforcement Officers (Page 374, #19) 
    • Collection of Data from Traffic Stops (Page 375, #20) 
    • Universal Background Check (Page 376, #21) 
    • Settlement Powers of the Attorney General (Page 377, #22) 
    • Settlement Revenues and Appropriation (Page 377, #23) 
    • Qui Tam Actions for False Claims (Page 378, #25) 

    KICKAPOO RESERVE MANAGEMENT BOARD  

    • Administrative Attachment to DOA (Page 379, #2) 

    LEGISLATURE 

    • Legislative Intervention (Page 382, #7) 
    • Retention of Legal Representation for Legislators, Legislative Staff and the Legislature  (Page 383, #8) 
    • Advice and Consent of the Senate for Appointments (Page 383, #9) 
    • Administrative Rules (Page 384, #10) 
    • Legislative and Congressional Redistricting (Page 384, #11) 

    LIEUTENANT GOVERNOR  

    • Additional Administrative Support (Page 386, #2) 
    • Administrative Attachment to DOA (Page 386, #3) 
    • Motion #19 Page 8 

    MARIJUANA RELATED PROVISIONS 

    • Modification of Uniform Controlled Substances Act Provisions and other Criminal Justice  Related Provisions and Definitions (Page 388, #1) 
    • Marijuana Regulation – Criminal and Civil Provisions (Page 390, #2) 
    • Unemployment Insurance – Discharge for Use of Marijuana (Page 392, #3)
    • Licensing of Producers, Processors, and Testing Labs (Page 393, #4) 
    • Marijuana Tax and Regulation (Page 395, #5) 
    • Medical Marijuana Registry (Page 404, #6) 
    • Community Reinvestment Fund (Page 405, #7) 
    • Joint Legislative Council Study – Marijuana (Page 406, #8) 

    MILITARY AFFAIRS  

    • Equity Officer Position (Page 413, #14)  

    NATURAL RESOURCES 

    Stewardship 

    • Stewardship Reviews by Joint Committee on Finance (Page 424, #2) 
    • Stewardship Public Access Requirements (Page 424, #3) 

    Forestry and Parks 

    • Sale of County Forest Land to Tribes (Page 427, #7) 
    • Eminent Domain for State Trails (Page 428, #13 and Page 577, #11) 
    • Parks and Forests Activity Guide (Page 428, #14) 

    Fish and Wildlife 

    • Resident Hunting and Fishing Identification (Page 431, #7) 

    Waste, Remediation, and Air 

    • PFAS Standards (Page 437, #5) 
    • Financial Responsibility for PFAS (Page 438, #6) 
    • Certified PFAS Testing Laboratories (Page 439, #7) 
    • Hazardous Substance Discharge Investigations (Page 439, #8) 
    • Ban on Coal Tar-Based Sealants (Page 442, #14) 
    • Local Regulation of Auxiliary Containers (Page 442, #15) 

    Water Quality 

    • Well Construction Notification Fee (Page 444, #2)  
    • Well Construction Variances Application Fee (Page 444, #3)  
    • Hydrologic Restoration Council and General Permit (Page 449, #21) 

    PROGRAM SUPPLEMENTS  

    • Restore Discretionary Merit Compensation Funding (Page 452, #1)
    • Motion #19 Page 9 

    PUBLIC DEFENDER  

    • Charging and Sentencing Alternatives (Page 454, #3) 
    • Index Private Bar Attorney Compensation (Page 455, #8)  

    PUBLIC INSTRUCTION 

    General School Aids and Revenue Limits  

    • Four-Year-Old Kindergarten Membership (Page 463, #9) 
    • Categorical Aid  
    • Driver Education Aid (Page 473, #20) 

    Choice, Charter and Open Enrollment 

    • Private School Choice Programs and Special Needs Scholarship Program- Cap  Participation at 2021-2022 Levels (Page 479, #3)  
    • Private School Choice and Special Needs Scholarship Programs — Teacher Licensure  Requirement (Page 480, #4) 
    • Private School Choice and Special Needs Scholarship Programs — Information Required on  Property Tax Bill (Page 481, #5) 
    • Racine and Statewide Choice Programs- Prior Year Attendance Requirement (Page 482,  #6) 
    • Milwaukee Private School Choice Program- Eliminate City Choice Levy Aid (Page 482,  #7)  
    • Special Needs Scholarship Program- Delete Actual Cost Reimbursement Provision (Page  483, #9)  
    • Special Needs Scholarship Program — Private School Requirements (Page 484, #10) 
    • Special Education Scholarship Program — Religious Activity Opt-Out (Page 484, #11) 
    • Choice, Charter, and Open Enrollment Payment Indexing Mechanism (Page 486, #13)  
    • Eliminate Office of Educational Opportunity (Page 487, #14)  
    • Independent Charter Schools- Driver Education Program Fees (Page 488, #16)  
    • Charter School Authorizer Report (Page 488, #17) 
    • Open Enrollment Aid Transfer Amount- Special Education (Page 489, #18) 
    •  Early College Credit Program—Payment to Private Schools (Page 489, #19) 
    • Early College Credit Program—Independent Charter School Pupils (Page 489, #20) 
    • Opportunity Schools and Partnerships Program (Page 490, #21) 
    • School Operations and Curriculum 
    • Prohibit Vaping on School Property (Page 492, # 1) 
    • Delete MPS Truancy Center and Law Enforcement Officer Requirements (Page 492, #2) 
    • American Indian Studies Required in Curriculum — School Districts (Page 492, #3) 
    • American Indian Studies Required in Curriculum — Choice and Charter Schools (Page 493,  #4) 
    • Health Problems Education Programs (Page 493, #5)
    • Motion #19 Page 10 

    Administrative and Other Funding 

    • Equity Officer Position (Page 496, #12)  
    • Report on Homeless Pupils (Page 498, #18) 
    • Climate Change in Model Academic Standards (Page 498, #19) 
    • American Indian Instruction — Teaching License (Page 499, #20) 

    PUBLIC SERVICE COMMISSION 

    Evers declared 2021 to be the year of broadband, but many budget provisions tied to broadband are cut from his budget for the PSC. As is the case with other departments, provisions tied to climate change and sustainability — as well as equity — are also set to be cut.

    Broadband Provisions 

    • Broadband Expansion Grant Eligibility for Municipalities (Page 501, #2)  
    • Municipal Broadband Facilities in Underserved or Unserved Areas (Page 502, #7) 
    • Use of Electric Transmission Easement for Broadband Service (Page 503, #8) • Internet Service Provider Registration (Page 504, #9) 
    • Broadband Consumer Protections (Page 504, #10)  

    Department-wide and Energy Programs 

    • Focus on Energy Contribution Rate (Page 505, #2)  
    • Focus on Energy Programs for Low Income Households (Page 505, #3)
    • Intervenor Compensation for Citizens Utility Board [language but maintain funding] (Page  506, #5) 
    • Low-Income Advocate Intervenor Compensation (Page 507, #6)  
    • Equity Officer Position (Page 507, #7)  
    • Social Cost of Carbon (Page 507, #8) 
    • Utility Financing of Energy Improvements (Page 507, #9) 
    • Model Ordinance for Property Assessed Clean Energy Programs (Page 508, #10)
    • Financing for Retirement of Nonrenewable Generating Facilities (Page 508, #11) 
    • Voluntary Innovative Technology Program (Page 508, #12) 
    • Increase Pipeline Safety Penalty (Page 509, #13) 
    • Nonutility Electric Vehicle Charging Stations (Page 509, #14) 
    • Transfer Administration of High-Voltage Impact Fees (Page 509, #15)  

    REVENUE 

    More cuts to equity, elimination of revenue from legalizing cannabis and cracking down on vaping are all cut from the department that collects the payments.

    Department-wide 

    • Administration and Enforcement of Marijuana Tax and Regulation (Page 512, #4) 
    • Marijuana Permit Fees (Page 512, #5) 
    • Equity Officer Position (Page 512, #6)  
    • Notice of Utility Taxes Certified by Mail (Page 512, #7)  
    • Regulation of Alcohol, Tobacco, Nicotine Products, and Vapor Products
    • Publication of List of Alcohol Beverage Retail Licenses (Page 513, #1) 
    • Extended Closing Hours during Special Events (Page 513, #2) 
    • Minimum Age for Cigarettes, Nicotine, Tobacco, and Vapor Products (Page 514, #3) 

    Lottery Administration 

    • Wisconsin Lottery — Definition of Multijurisdictional (Page 518, #7)
    • Motion #19 Page 11

    SAFETY AND PROFESSIONAL SERVICES 

    • Equity Officer Position (Page 524, #10)  
    • Construction Contractor Registration (Page 524 #12) 
    • Prohibit Use of Vapor Products in Indoor Locations (Page 525, #13) 
    • Create an Appropriation to Receive Inter-Agency Transfers (Page 526, #15)
    • Dental Therapists (Page 526, #16) 
    • Pharmacist Training in Naloxone Use (Page 530, #17) 
    • Pharmacist Continuing Education (Page 531, #18) 

    SECRETARY OF STATE  

    This office has been cut over the years repeatedly, Evers budget sought to return some of its responsibilities and resources.

    • Additional Resources for the Office (Page 532, #2)  
    • Transfer from DFI (Page 533, #3)  
    • Administrative Attachment to DOA (Page 533, #4)  
    • Transfer Municipal Filing Records and Duties from DOA (Page 533, #5)  

    SHARED REVENUE AND TAX RELIEF 

    The Dark Store tax loophole that allows companies operating big box stores to be taxed as though they are closed has been a loophole Democrats (and even some Republicans) have been pushing to close and Evers’ budget did that. JFC Republicans are saying no to that. Evers also offered local units of government more local control, which is also being eliminated.

    Property Taxation 

    Expenditure Restraint Program – Definition of Municipal Budget (Page 538, #8) • Levy Limits—2% Minimum Levy Increase (Page 540, #1)  

    • Levy Limits- Repeal of Negative Adjustment for Fees from Covered Services (Page 540,  #2)  
    • Levy Limits—Repeal of Negative Adjustment for Transferred Services (Page 541, #3) 
    • Levy Limit- Exclusion for Regional Planning Commission Contributions (Page 541, #4) 
    • Levy Limit- Exclusion for Cross-Border Transit Routes (Page 541, #5)  
    • Dark Property and Leased Property Tax Assessments (“Dark Stores”) (Page 542, #6) 
    • Community Health Center Property Tax Exemption (Page 543, #7) 
    • Collection of Manufacturing Property Assessment Fees (Page 544, #8) 
    • City of Wisconsin Dells TIF Districts — Extension of Allowable Expenditure Period (Page  544, #9) 
    • Workforce Housing Laws Related to TIF Districts, Local Housing Initiatives and State  Grants, and Impact Fees (Page 545, #10) 

    Local Revenue Options 

    • Local Sales Tax Authority (Page 547, #1)  
    • City of Superior Local Exposition District (Page 548, #2) 

    STATE FAIR PARK 

    • Reauthorize State Fair Park Board Rulemaking Authority (Page 552, #3)
    • Sales of Alcohol Beverages at State Fair Park (Page 553, #4) 
    • Administrative Attachment to DOA (Page 553, #5) 
    • Motion #19 Page 12 

    STATE TREASURER 

    • Increased Resources for the Office (Page 554, #2) 
    • Small Business Retirement Savings Board (Page 555, #3) 
    • Administrative Attachment to DOA (Page 555, #4) 

    TOURISM 

    • Convert Tribal Gaming Marketing Funds to General Purpose Revenue (Page 558, #4) 
    • Mass Burial Monument at UW-Stevens Point (Page 559, #8)  
    • Agency Equity Officer (Page 559, #9)  
    • Interagency Transfers Appropriation (Page 560, #10)  
    • Administrative Services from DOA (Page 560, #11)  

    TRANSPORTATION 

    Among the list of cuts here from Evers’ budget are drivers licenses for undocumented immigrants and making voter-only ID cards valid for a longer period. Funding highway and other infrastructure improvements has been something that Republicans have long disagreed about amongst themselves even when all branches were controlled by the GOP, so the tension will likely be high when it comes up in this budget.

    Local Transportation Assistance 

    • Intermodal Freight Assistance Grant Program Modifications (Page 576, #10)
    • Repeal 2017 Act 368 Local Transportation Project Provisions (Page 577, #12) 

    State Highway Program 

    • Reinstate DOT’s Authority Related to Bicycle and Pedestrian Facilities on New Highway Construction Projects (Page 588, #10)  
    • Repeal 2017 Act 368 Federal Funding Limitations on State Highway Projects (Page 588,  #11) 

    Motor Vehicles 

    • Identification Card Receipts for Voting Purposes — Valid Period (Page 593, #7)
    • Real ID Non-Compliant Driver Licenses and Identification Cards for Undocumented  Persons [For Purposes Other Than Voting] (Page 594, #9) 
    • Wisconsin Identification Card Information Release Standardization (Page 596, #10) 
    • Exemption from Probationary License Requirements — United States Armed Forces (Page  597, #11) 
    • Prohibit Arrest and License Suspension for Nonmoving Violations (Page 597, #12) 

    Department

    • DOT Contracting Authority (Page 601, #4) 
    • Equity Officer Position (Page 601, #7) 
    • Motion #19 Page 13 

    UNIVERSITY OF WISCONSIN SYSTEM  

    UW borrowing for operational expenses is being eliminated with this motion.

    • Borrowing for Operational Purposes (Page 604, #5) 
    • Tuition Promise Expansion (Page 604, #4) 
    • Minnesota-Wisconsin Reciprocity Agreement (Page 606, #7)  
    • Prisoner Baccalaureate Degree Program (Page 608, #12)  
    • Site Preparation for UW Stevens Point Monument (Page 612, #24) 
    • UW-Madison Division of Extension Teaching Hours (Page 613, #25) 
    • Nonresident Tuition Exemption for Relocated Service Members (Page 613, #26)
    • Nonresident Tuition Exemption for Certain Tribal Members (Page 613, #27) 
    • Nonresident Tuition Exemption for Undocumented Individuals (Page 614, #28)
    • Voter Identification (Page 614, #29 and Page 632, #8) 

    VETERANS AFFAIRS  

    • Equity Officer Position (Page 617, #5)

    WISCONSIN ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT CORPORATION  

    • Underserved Community Grants (Page 622, #5) 
    • Economic Development Fund Interest and Unexpended Balances (Page 622, #7)
    • Main Street Program Technical Modifications (Page 624, #11) 
    • Modifications to Brownfields Redevelopment and Site Assessment Grant Programs (Page  625, #12) 
    • Data Sharing with DOR (Page 625, #13)  
    • Repeal Obsolete Reporting Requirement for the Economic Development Tax Credit  Program (Page 626, #14)  
    • Modify Annual Reporting Requirement to the Legislature (Page 626, #15)  

    WISCONSIN HEALTH AND EDUCATIONAL FACILITIES AUTHORITY

    • Financing Working Capital Expenditure (Page 627, #1)  

    WISCONSIN HOUSING AND ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT AUTHORITY 

    • Small Business Equity Investment (Page 628, #2)  
    • Housing Choice Voucher Priority for Homeless Children (Page 628, #3)
    • Discrimination on the Basis of Gender Expression, Gender Identity or Sexual Orientation  (Page 629, #4 and Page 655, #14) 

    WISCONSIN TECHNICAL COLLEGE SYSTEM 

    The governor’s budget contained a number of changes for the technical colleagues designed to make them more accessible to new classes of students. These changes will be cut.

    • Revenue Limit—2% Increase (Page 631, #4)  
    • Nonresident Tuition Exemption for Undocumented Individuals (Page 631, #5) 
    • Nonresident Tuition Exemption for Certain Tribal Members (Page 631, #6)
    • Nonresident Tuition Exemption for Relocated Service Members (Page 632, #7)
    • Motion #19 Page 14 

    WORKFORCE DEVELOPMENT 

    The Republicans are cutting anything that looks to change any of the anti-worker moves made by the GOP under former Gov. Scott Walker. From prevailing wage to minimum wage to pay cuts caused by Right to Work legislation — all those changes will be eliminated, along with other pro-worker measures.

    Departmentwide and Worker’s Compensation 

    • Worker’s Compensation — Electronic Transmission of Worker’s Compensation Records  and Payments (Page 635, #5) 
    • Worker’s Compensation — Uninsured Employer Penalties (Page 636, #6)
    • Worker’s Compensation — Substantial Fault (Page 637, #7) 

    Employment and Training 

    • Employment Transit Assistance Program Modification (Page 642, #10) 

    Equal Rights and Employment Regulation 

    • Investigation and Enforcement of Worker Classification (Page 644, #2)
    • Minimum Wage (Page 645, #8) 
    • Prevailing Wage (Page 646, #9) 
    • Repeal Right to Work (Page 648, #10) 
    • Project Labor Agreements (Page 650, #11) 
    • Local Employment Regulations (Page 650, #12) 
    • Family and Medical Leave (Page 651, #13) 
    • Civil Actions Regarding Employment Discrimination, Unfair Honesty, and Unfair Genetic  Testing (Page 658, #15) 
    • Job Applicant Conviction History (Page 660, #16) 
    • Location of Equal Rights Hearings (Page 660, #17) 

    Unemployment Insurance 

    • Systems Modernization (Page 661, #1) 
    • Drug Testing (Page 662, #3)  
    • Weekly Benefit Rate (Page 663, #4) 
    • Maximum Weekly Earning Threshold for Partial Benefits (Page 664, #5) 
    • Waiting Period (Page 664, #6) 
    • Work Search (Page 665, #7) 
    • Receipt of Social Security Disability Insurance Payments (Page 667, #8) 
    • Substantial Fault (Page 667, #9) 
    • Quit Exception and Canvassing Period (Page 668, #10) 
    • Voluntary Termination (Page 669, #11) 
    • Electronic Reporting and Transactions (Page 670, #13)
    • Motion #19 (Page 15)