Brief

DHS: Wastewater shows COVID increase, but significance not yet certain

By: - March 15, 2022 6:03 pm
wastewater treatment plant

A wastewater treatment plant (Ivan Bandura | Unsplash)

Concentrations of the virus responsible for COVID-19 in wastewater in some Wisconsin cities have been increasing, state health officials confirmed Tuesday, but the significance of that development isn’t clear.

Wastewater virus testing “has been shown to be a leading indicator of cases,” according Elizabeth Goodsitt, a spokeswoman for the state Department of Health Services (DHS), “but more data is needed before we can confirm indications of rising trends.”

About 40% of Wisconsin residents live in areas of the state where wastewater is monitored for changes in the concentration of the SARS-CoV-2 virus in wastewater samples.

Data collected through Wednesday, March 9, has shown increases in the virus concentration in Milwaukee, Green Bay and some smaller communities. DHS has a web page that reports the wastewater virus results from participating wastewater treatment plants around the state. 

“These SARS-CoV-2 concentrations are still low, and in a range where there is greater uncertainty in detecting trends,” Goodsitt stated. “However, upward trends identified in larger cities are suggestive of increased community transmission.”

In many other parts of the state, the virus concentration has been declining, the DHS web page indicates. 

DHS officials are looking to the wastewater data to provide advance warning of potential new surges in COVID-19 cases around the state.

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Erik Gunn
Erik Gunn

Deputy Editor Erik Gunn reports and writes on work and the economy, health policy and related subjects, for the Wisconsin Examiner. He spent 24 years as a freelance writer for Milwaukee Magazine, Isthmus, The Progressive, BNA Inc., and other publications, winning awards for investigative reporting, feature writing, beat coverage, business writing, and commentary. An East Coast native, he previously covered labor for The Milwaukee Journal after reporting for newspapers in upstate New York and northern Illinois. He's a graduate of Beloit College (English Comp.) and the Columbia School of Journalism. Off hours he is the Examiner's resident Springsteen and Jackson Browne fanboy and model railroad nerd.

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