Brief

Legislature has resolution to honor Rush Limbaugh

By: - February 22, 2021 2:41 pm
WASHINGTON, DC - FEBRUARY 04: Radio personality Rush Limbaugh reacts as First Lady Melania Trump gives him the Presidential Medal of Freedom during the State of the Union address in the chamber of the U.S. House of Representatives on February 04, 2020 in Washington, DC. President Trump delivers his third State of the Union to the nation the night before the U.S. Senate is set to vote in his impeachment trial. (Photo by Mario Tama/Getty Images)

WASHINGTON, DC – FEBRUARY 04: Radio personality Rush Limbaugh reacts as First Lady Melania Trump gives him the Presidential Medal of Freedom during the State of the Union address in the chamber of the U.S. House of Representatives on February 04, 2020 in Washington, DC. President Trump delivers his third State of the Union to the nation the night before the U.S. Senate is set to vote in his impeachment trial. (Photo by Mario Tama/Getty Images)

Wisconsin legislative Republicans continue to demand that the state recognize and honor talk radio host Rush Limbaugh in the wake of his Feb. 17 death. Shortly after his death, Assembly Speaker Robin Vos sent a letter to Gov. Tony Evers requesting that the flag be lowered in Limbaugh’s honor.

Now legislators are circulating a resolution in the Wisconsin Legislature, seeking cosponsors. It reads:

“Last week (February 17), America lost one of the greatest conservative voices we had over the last few decades – Rush Limbaugh. The impact he had on millions of Americans’ lives, spreading the message of patriotism and freedom, will never go unnoticed. Commemorating his career and accomplishments is the least this body can do to recognize and honor the amazing life he led.”

The sponsors of the resolution are Sen. Andre Jacque (R-DePere) and Rep. Shae Sortwell (R-Two Rivers.) The pair asked for co-sponsors to respond immediately on Monday, in hopes the resolution could be added to Tuesday’s special session agenda in the Assembly. Sortwell’s office confirms that is the goal, but said it had not yet been determined if the item would be added to the agenda, which is focused on a bill on COVID-19 response and unemployment insurance technology updates to help alleviate the backlog.

Limbaugh achieved a national presence among far-right conservatives by demeaning not just others’ political opinions, but also for mocking women, people of color, LGBTQ people and people with AIDS. He also, not long before his death, attempted to justify the deadly violence at the Capitol on Jan. 6 as patriotism. 

He expressed hope that former President Barack Obama would fail, suggested Jesse Jackson looked like “all composite pictures of wanted criminals” and compared NFL games to watching the “Bloods and the Crips without weapons.”

President Donald Trump awarded Limbaugh the Presidential Medal of Freedom. 

Vos, in his letter, described Limbaugh saying, “While some individuals may only see him as a popular radio host, he was a pioneer in talk radio, a best-selling author and a commentator who inspired generations to become active in politics. No doubt, there are people who did not agree with him, but there is no question that he made a lasting impact on political discourse and conservativism in our nation.”

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Melanie Conklin
Melanie Conklin

Melanie Conklin is proud to be a native of the state of Wisconsin, which gave humankind the typewriter, progressivism and deep-fried cheese curds. Her several decades in journalism include political beats and columns at Isthmus newspaper, the Wisconsin State Journal and other publications. When not an ink-stained wretch, she served time inside state, local and federal government in communications. She is excited to be back at the craft of journalism as Deputy Editor of the Wisconsin Examiner. It’s what she’s loved ever since getting her master’s degree in journalism from the UW-Madison. Her family includes one husband, two kids, four dogs and five (or more) chinchillas.

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